Raise your hand if you’re broke af.

Our generation is #BrokeAF.  Whether it be student loans, childcare, or finding the money for tuition in the first place, thousands of young people in Georgia are struggling every day just because they want a higher education. The good news is state legislators passed a needs-based financial aid bill for low-income young people. The bad news is it’s not funded yet, and we’re fighting every day to make sure it includes enough funding to help as many young people get to college as possible. But to do that, we need your story. Having your voice in the debate is the only way we can get free tuition for all young people. Share your story so we can know exactly what you need to live your best...

GS/Five: Alissa Robbins

The GS/Five is a blog series highlighting young leaders across the state of Georgia. Five questions, five answers on current issues, advice for young people, and the future of the state.  Today we interview Alissa Robbins, who is currently the Office and Database Coordinator of SPARK Reproductive Justice NOW, and a senior at Georgia State University studying journalism, women’s studies, and public policy.    We’re about 3 months into the year, what are you up to these days? There are three issues that we at SPARK Reproductive Justice Now (SPARK) are focusing on during the 2015 Legislative Session; Closing the Coverage Gap, Improving Maternal Health, and Improving Reproductive and Sexual Health. There are still over 600K Georgians living without health insurance. They either don’t make enough money to get MarketPlace coverage, or they make too much money, so they don’t qualify to receive Medicaid coverage. This leaves them stuck in this “coverage gap” without getting the healthcare they and their families need. We’re failing these individuals and families when we can do so much better by closing that gap. Our elected officials have the power to solve this problem so we are holding them accountable. Often times when talking about pregnancies, we focus more on the health of the infant and overlook the health of the mother, which is just as important. Georgia currently has the highest maternal mortality rate in the nation – 30 maternal deaths for every 100,000 live births. Last year, the state created a maternal mortality review committee, which is a big step, but the Legislature needs to transcribe those findings into active policies that will...

GS/Five: Charles Orgbon III

The GS/Five is a blog series highlighting progressive leaders across the state of Georgia. Five questions, five answers on current issues, advice for young progressives, and the future of the state.  Today we interview Charles Orgbon III, who founded Greening Forward six years ago when he was 12-years-old. Today, the University of Georgia Presidential Leadership Scholar’s middle school hobby transformed into one of the largest environmental organizations spearheaded by students, which has given away over $58,000 to train and fund young environmental leaders.   Coming into the new year, what are your plans for Greening Forward and the environmental movement? Greening Forward is preparing for our signature event of the year, our International Young Environmentalist Youth Summit (IYEYS), and it’ll be held in New York City on March 1 – 2, 2015 at The Point Community Development Center. This is our premiere event of the training aspect of what we do to support the youth driven environmental movement. We fund and train young people; that’s at the heart of what Greening Forward does. The principle way that we fund them is through a grants programs that is often issued in the fall, the beginning of the school year, and in the middle of all of the activities, is when we have this international youth summit.   What inspired you to join the environmental movement, and start Greening Forward? It was actually a community service project, picking up litter after school. That action led me to really question why are people doing this? I shouldn’t have to do this because people should already know how littering degrades our environment. Something...

GS/Five: Dominick Perkins

The GS/Five is a blog series highlighting leaders across the state of Georgia. Five questions, five answers on current issues, advice for young people, and the future of Georgia.  Today, we interview Dominick Perkins. Dominick is a resident of Columbus, Georgia and has served in various roles on federal, state, and local campaigns, most recently as the Data Director for Congressman Sanford Bishop’s successful 2014 re-election bid. He proudly serves as the President of the Muscogee County Young Democrats and as the Campaigns Committee Chair for the Young Democrats of Georgia. You can add him on Facebook at facebook.com/dominick.perkins or follow him on Twitter @Dom4thewin.   Now that the midterm election is over, whatʼre you up to these days? I was still doing post- election wrap up for Congressman Bishop’s re-election bid until about two weeks ago, so that has taken up a lot of my time. My primary work is as a Political Consultant, so I am spending most of my time helping a few candidates with their races in other parts of the country. I’m also working as an Adjunct Instructor of Political Science, which isn’t extremely time consuming, but is certainly something that I enjoy doing. What inspired you to take the first leap into politics? My interest in politics comes from my experiences as a child. My mother insisted that we watch the local and national news daily because she always wanted us to be aware of what was going on in the world. It drove me crazy back then, but I am so happy that she did that for me. My mother is from Germany...